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The Phoenix Park offers runners a haven away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Listen to regular runner in the park Fiona Donnellan,  as she sets off on her daily run in the Phoenix Park.

 

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The Phoenix Park is home to nearly 500 Fallow Deer who roam freely throughout the grounds. The present day herd is descended from deer brought into the park in 1662.

 

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The Phoenix Park tunnel, which was built in 1877 by the Great Southern and Western Railway, runs for half a mile beneath the green pastures of the park.

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Ashtown Castle was only discovered in 1978, as it was enclosed within the walls of a building for years. When this building was being demolished, the castle was discovered.

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On the bright spring evening of May 6th, 1882, members of a secret nationalist society known as ‘The Invincibles’ stabbed and killed the Chief Secretary, Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Burke.

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In 1873, Mr. Horace Rochford, established the All Ireland Polo Club in the Phoenix Park. The polo club play every Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday on the polo grounds in the Phoenix Park (weather permitting).

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Soccer is just one of the many sports played in the Phoenix Park. One of the oldest football teams in Ireland Bohemian FC, played in the park from 1890 until 1893.

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Áras an Uachtaráin, meaning house of the president in Irish, is the official residence of the President of Ireland, Michael D. Higgins. Construction on the grounds began in 1751 by park ranger and architect, Nathaniel Clements.

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In 1838, workmen for the Commissioners of Woods and Forests, discovered a burial mound in this location. Evidence shows that the mound was used during the Neolithic and Bronze Age.

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The Royal Zoological Society of Dublin was established at a meeting held at the Rotunda Hospital on May 10th, 1830. The zoo, then called the Zoological Gardens Dublin, was opened on September 1st, 1831.

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In the early 20th century, the Dublin United Tramways Company paid brass bands about £4 each to perform on the band stand outside the zoo.

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The Wellington Monument is an obelisk located in the Phoenix Park.It is the tallest obelisk in Europe ,standing at 203 feet. The monument is located at the south-east end of the park and overlooks the River Liffey and Kilmainham

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Farmleigh House was originally used as the summer residence of the Guinness family. The house is steeped in history, with many of the original furnishings and artworks still available to view in the house.

 

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The Papal Cross is a large simple white cross designed by the Irish firm Scott, Tallon and Walker Associates. It was erected on the 14th September  1979, for the visit of the late Pope John Paul II.

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‘Now’s here’s a proof of Irish sense, here Irish wit is seen, when nothing’s left that’s worth defence, we build a magazine’

– Jonathan Swift

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The lamps in the park are still lit by gas, however, they no longer need to be manually lit each evening. Irish writer James Joyce, mentions the lighting of the lamps that line Chersterfield Avenue, in his novel, Finnegan’s Wake.

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GAA has been played in the Phoenix Park since 1881, when Michael Cusack held a sports day to encourage Irish sporting events. The park is now home to seven GAA pitches that are typically used for Gaelic football, hurling and camogie.

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The Leinster Model Flying Club established in 1972, is the largest model flying club in Ireland, with up to ninety members. Its main aim is to promote the safe flying of radio controlled aircraft in a friendly environment.

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The Phoenix Park provides 20km of cycle paths for visitors to experience, enjoy and tour the park safely. Take in all the sights, smells and sounds of the park as you spin down the designated cycle lanes, or go off the beaten track if you’re feeling more adventurous.

 

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The beautiful cricket grounds boast an historic pavilion and stunning views. Whether you are playing or just spectating, it is a great place to spend an afternoon in the sunshine.

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The gardens in the Phoenix Park Visitors’ Centre are buzzing with the sound of bees! Listen to the Phoenix Park Bee Keepers discuss their award winning honey.

 

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The Furry Glen is a conservation area located in the south-west corner of the Phoenix Park, near Knockmaroon Gate.

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The Victorian Tea Rooms were originally constructed as an ice cream kiosk for visitors to the park and zoo in the late 1800s. It is now home to a popular independent café.

 

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The Phoenix Monument is a column carved from Portland Stone, dating from 1747. It is centrally located on Chesterfield Avenue, the main thoroughfare of the park.

 

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Farmleigh’s walled garden is a feast for the senses. Dating back to the early 19th Century, the gardens are home to a beautiful array of flowers and plants.

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The gardens were originally established in 1840 as the Promenade Grounds.  They provide an opportunity for visitors to view Victorian horticulture at its finest.  

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The Citadel Pond was formed in the remains of a moat, which once enclosed a large, star-shaped fort. The fort was removed in the 19th Century, but the hollow remained as a water feature.

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